Starcrossed lovers: A photo essay.

30 09 2009

Starcrossed Cyclocross has grown from a novelty event under the floodlights of the Marymoor Velodrome to the first high profile event on the national cyclocross calendar. It is a priority for professionals and amateurs alike – within one hour of online registration opening, over one third of the available spaces in the category 3 men’s field were snatched up. However, the on-the-ball crew at Recycled Cycles Racing managed to get their fair share of riders enrolled in several categories. This is their story.

So i preregistered 2 months early. Stood in line for 1/2 hr. having an anxiety attack. Got a parking ticket while I was standing there.Jason Cameron

Jason C, Carl A, and Randy S make some last minute adjustments. Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

“Went out a little to fast… must figure out how to get into the first two rows” - Josh Simpson

The starts were fast and furious in all fields. Four corners in and the Cat 4 men are wrecking already. Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

There are an awfully large number of people willing to run into me in this race.Luke St. Claire

Photo: Carry Porter

Photo: Carry Porter

I did an awesome remount where I jumped clear over the top of my bike and landed on my back on the other side! – Kevin Speltz

Kevin Speltz looking for a wheel. Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

Please oh please let me hang on through these last turns….oh thank god, i need a beer.  - Randy Salamon

Photo: Carry Porter

Photo: Carry Porter

Why the hell am i starting in the second to last row?Randy Salamon

Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

I mean, this is just the Cat 4 World Championships, after all.Chris Tremonte

Photo: Carry Porter

Photo: Carry Porter

Josh just passed me in the corner. I sure do suck at corners. Why does this tight hairpin have to be right after the logs?Chris Tremonte

Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Carry Porter

Photo: Carry Porter

Wow there’s a lot of people here! Getting out of the parking lot is gonna suck. – Todd Schneider

Photo: Nick Brown

Photo: Nick Brown





RCR’s Private Idaho

17 09 2009

He has been on a tear this season, and Adam “Turtle” Jablonski did not disappoint when the RCR crew packed the van and crossed state lines. By now you know that the Turtle put up a characteristically dominant win in front of the rowdy crowds at the Boise Twilight Criterium. But the open question is, how did it all come together? How did dedicated teammates and smart riding put Adam on the top step of the podium at one of the region’s big money events?

 Recycled Cycles Racing News (RCRN) checked in with Adam to find out how it all went down.

The Van is fast

Road trip! There's a race out here somewhere...

 RCRN: First all AJ, nice work on the win. Set the stage for us.

AJ: Thanks. We were definitely looking forward to this one. The Recycled Cycles crew loaded up the team van with five cat 3s and a couple local pros and steeled ourselves for the 8 hour drive  to the summer sauna that is Boise, Idaho. The Boise Twilight Criterium is known for high speed, big crowds and big money, so the team was motivated for a proper throw down.

RCRN: Sauna? That sounds daunting. What’s it like to race in a sauna? Steamy? Did you wear a towel?

AJ: Steamy is right! The cat 3 race took place at the hottest time of the day and warm-up consisted entirely of trying to stay cool. Most racers brought one bottle to drink and one to dump on their heads. Road temp at race time was 112 degrees, quickly turning that cool splash of water on the head into a hot shower.

The pace was high from the gun and Rookie (“Rookie” is Brian Wachlarz – Ed) was the first to try his hand off the front. Next to go was Randy, out for big money primes to help defray the costs of later aluminum can structural engineering, while the rest of the team took up position at the front to protect our man’s lead. By mid-race, things calmed down and the pack was content to let a small break dangle a few seconds up the road.

RCRN: The Recycled gang isn’t one to approach a race passively, so how did you guys change the situation?

AJ: With three laps to go, I was concentrating on moving to the front for the sprint, but wasn’t having much luck due to the pace (averaging about 27-28 mph) and the withering heat. I was feeling a little guilty about not spending much time on or off the front up to that point so talked myself into a hard burst up the inside on the back side of the course on the final lap. I couldn’t justify finishing with any energy in the tank after seeing the effort my teammates had put in.
 

RCRN: Rightly so. Then what?

This is how Adam Jablonski guns it.

This is how Adam Jablonski guns it.

AJ: I made it to the front and took a quick look for a wheel to follow; no such luck as everyone else had the same idea. So instead I used my momentum to go right past the group and get a small gap over the field through the 3rd corner. At that point it was do or die, so I put my head down and went for it. I looked up once to navigate between the curb and a cooked rider sitting up, and then again with about 200 ft. to go, just in time to steer around another fading rider. I couldn’t believe I’d held off the pack from so far out. The severe oxygen debt kept me from celebrating for an extra second, but we’d taken the win in front of the big crowd!

RCRN: Good work. So you followed it up with a massage and mineral water, right?

AJ: Absolutely! We celebrated that evening in fine old-school Recycled Cycles style, sipping celebratory beers in the shade and cheering on the Gato in the pro race. It’s always a great feeling when the team’s hard work pays off with another win, and it sure makes the long drive home a little easier!

RCRN: Congratulations to you and the team.

Look out for more stories from the boys in blue and gold soon!








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.